Why Remove Old Coatings When Switching to TWP Stains

Why Remove Old Coatings When Switching to TWP Stains

TWP Stains have been around for over 20 years. They are one of the only EPA registered wood preservatives on the market today. Using the highest quality raw materials, TWP offers superb protection from UV discoloration, fading, rot, decay, and water damage. It can be used on nearly any exterior wood surface to enhance the wood’s natural beauty and provide years of protection.

When switching to TWP Stains for your outdoor wood project it is important to understand the fundamentals of stain application. In order for a stain like TWP to work effectively and give the most protection the wood surface should be cleaned prior to staining. All dirt, grime, mold, mildew, and graying should be removed completely. In addition, any old coatings should also be removed when switching to TWP stains.

Why remove old coatings when switching to TWP stains? This is so TWP can dive deep into the wood pores for maximum protection. If any old coatings of stain are left on the wood surface it can prevent a penetrating stain like TWP from doing its job. The new stain would simply sit on top of the old coating and would not be able to perform to its full potential. Removing any old coatings will reveal bare wood allowing TWP to penetrate and protect, as it should.

To remove old coatings when switching to TWP Stains, use a product like Restore-A-Deck Stain Stripper. Unlike a wood cleaner, a stain stripper will also clean the wood in addition to breaking down any old coatings so they can be removed during the cleaning process as well. It's crucial to remove all the old coatings so TWP can perform as expected. Once this process is complete, maintenance with TWP is a breeze. The wood can simply be cleaned every few years and recoated with fresh TWP. This will result in a beautiful long lasting wood surface for many years of enjoyment.

 

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8 Comments on "Why Remove Old Coatings When Switching to TWP Stains"

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Eric Anderson
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Eric Anderson

Should I use an orbital sander on all surfaces before I restain?

Todd
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Todd

Will the Restore a deck stain stripper work on rough sawn cedar wood that is used vertically to create walls for a planter and cabinet?

Richman
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Richman
I bought a condo with a 20+ year old deck here in Michigan. It faces North, has quite a bit of mold/moisture build up in the first few feet near the house, and needs about 20% replacement of rotten deck boards with new cedar. There also is some residual stain left on the rest of the deck. Just trying to get some advice as to the proper steps to make this deck look as good as possible. I’m guessing…1. Replace rotten boards. 2. Clean/strip deck? 3. brighten. 4. Apply finish coat of stain. Also, I was considering using a solid… Read more »
TWPStainHelp
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TWPStainHelp

You have the correct steps. How to strip and apply the TWP is on our help site:

TWP Stain Help

Marmota
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Marmota

I have redwood hand rails that were previously stained with what is now a badly weathered oil based Sikkens product. Since I am only refinishing rail caps, I was going to remove them and sand them clean. Will that suffice as prepping for TWC 1500?

TWPStainHelp
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TWPStainHelp

Yes as long as you remove all of the Sikkens.

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