Prepping New Wood For TWP Stains

by TWP Help

Last Updated on May 8, 2021 by TWP Help

TWP Stain Tips for New wood Decks in 2021

When applying TWP Wood Stains for the first time to new wood there will need to be proper steps taken. New smooth wood or decking is not ready to be pre-stained prior to installation or stained right after installation. It is best to follow the directions of the TWP Wood Stain when it comes to applying a coating to new wood for the first time, not the lumber yard or the paint store’s as they do not understand the proper prep needed.

TWP and New Smooth Decking or Exterior Wood

It is important to understand that new smooth wood is not absorbent enough for the TWP Stains. New wood contains a higher moisture content and a “mill glaze”. Mill Glaze is a waxy film that results from the fast turning blades that cut the profile on a manufactured log. The high speed of the turning blades produces heat that draws sap and moisture out of the log. As it cools and dries, it creates a film or coating on the logs. This will hinder the TWP’s ability to penetrate into the wood grain.

Note: New Rough Sawn vertical wood/fencing can be stained right away with no wait and with no prep as it does not have mill glaze and is very absorbent. Just make sure the wood is fully dry. If Rough sawn wood has aged or oxidized (grayed) then it will need to be prepped with Gemini Restore Kit. One coat for most instances of newly installed Rough Sawn wood.

Let the Wood Weather First

TWP wants the wood to weather and dry out for 4-12 months after installation. This will allow the moisture content to drop and the exposed wood cells will oxidize from the sun’s UV, turning slightly gray.

Prepping New Wood for TWP Stains

After letting the wood weather it is time to prep the wood. This step consists of using the Gemini Restore A Deck Kit. This kit contains both a Step 1 Wood Deck Cleaner and a Step 2 Wood Deck Brightener. The Step 1 cleaner will help remove the dirt, graying, and mill glaze from the wood while Step 2 Brightener will neutralize the cleaner and help restore the natural color.

Staining New Wood and Decking for the First Time

Even after the waiting period and the proper prepping, new smooth wood is still not as absorbent as it will be in a few years. We strongly suggest only applying 1 coat of the TWP Stains the first time. Do not over apply as the TWP may not penetrate into the wood correctly. Make sure to back wipe any excess stain that does not penetrate properly into the wood after 30 minutes. For new smooth wood, the TWP 100 Series if allowed in your state, otherwise use the TWP 1500 Series.

Maintaining TWP Stains

Apply a light maintenance coat to the flooring in 9-24 months. If just slightly dirty prep with soapy water to remove grime and reapply one light coat. If you wait 18-24 months make sure to prep again with the Gemini Restore A Deck. After the first year or two, your wood will be able to absorb more TWP stain which results in a longer stain life and protection!

Tip:

TWP is a penetrating wood preservative. It performs properly when it penetrates 100% into the wood. Over applying will not result in longer protection.

Have a Question? Please Ask Below.

 

Related TWP Stain Help Tips

 
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Ike
Ike
1 day ago

I have a newly built dock on a lake. There’s a 1-month scheduled drawdown so home owners can work on docks and sea walls. Is it okay to use TWP 100 if there’s a 3-week+ drying time before water partially submerges the pilings (I want those to match the rest of the dock)? Or, should I use TWP 100 for above water and 1500 for where it may be submerged?

Raymond Huckleberry
Raymond Huckleberry
1 day ago

I’m getting ready to purchase and install new cedar shingle siding. I’ve read that I should “dip” the shingles before install. Which TWP product would be best for this, and do you advise it? If so how long should they be dipped for and is one dip sufficient as I see some dip them twice?

David Carl
David Carl
6 days ago

1) TWP 100 semi transparent oil based stain can be applied when temperatures are between 50 and 90 degrees, YES?

2) If I am applying here in MI during high humidity (temps in 80s or 90s, do I allow longer drying time for the first coat. First coat has to be “dry to the touch’ for applying second coat?

3) Do not apply stain in direct sunlight?

4) How do I know if my pressured treated pine deck, never stained before, sanded with 60-80 grit paper to remove mill glaze, will “take” a second coat? What do I look for after applying the first coat?

Thank you very much.

David Carl
David Carl
5 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thank you.

RE: The “wet on wet” approach:

1) How many minutes after first coat to apply the second coat?
2) Do you determine if it can take a second coat merely by the fact that first coat is dry after so many minutes?
3) If I run out of time and cannot do a second coat, could I wait until 9-12 months to do second coat-and if I do what would be the prep work-cleaner and brightner and then second coat? OR, cleaning with any deck cleaner.
4) Should I forego applying stain if I am not going to get 48 hours of drying time? Could I get by with 24 hours of drying time?
5) What to do if it rains after deck has only dried for 24 hours–will I see water stains? Can I do anything at that point?

6) What is the LOWEST temperature this stain can be applied and have adequate process to dry? I ask because right now in MI our temps are getting down to 50 at night.
7) I notice, too, that at night, the “dew” comes out and water drops are coming down at night on to 7 boards of mine pine-treated deck from the bottom of the gutters that’s part roof overhang. What’s likely to happen if this happens at night to one or two coats of stain trying to dry? What can I do to prevent this?

 
J. Colligan
J. Colligan
8 days ago

My brand new shed is made from kiln-dried white pine. It’s been up a week and rained on four times. I would like to use semi-transparent stain. Should I use the pre-treatment? I live in Ontario, Canada.

David Carl
David Carl
8 days ago

Hi, I’m going with TWP 100, either the redwood or the rustic color. 342 SF treated pine deck. Never stained. UV damage on some panels. Live in MI. Some mill glaze on some panels already. Confirming process: 1) Gemini cleaner. 2) After drying sand with 80 grit paper to remove current mill glaze fuzzies and any new mill glaze fuzzies that result from cleaner. 3) Apply gemini brighter. 4) Wait 24 hours then apply one coat and then second coat with 60 minutes of first coat. 5) Pray that it doesn’t rain for at least 24 hours. TWO ADDITIONAL QUESTIONS: A-If I will get more mill glaze, will it show up after cleaner and before brigtner or after cleaner? C-Or should I sand BEFORE cleaner and brightner? D-If I cannot get second coat. Do I apply second coat in a year and if so do I have to use gemini cleaner and brightner again to do second coat in a year? Or E_ just lightly clean deck with a regular cleaner and apply second coat? SEE ATTACHED PICS OF CURRENT DECK.

White fuzzies bleaching.jpg
knotts on deck.jpg
After Shot deck.jpg
David Carl
David Carl
7 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Really appreciate the help. If my deck is dry after 48 hours of doing cleaner and brightner but it then rains, do I start the clock of waiting another 48 hours for deck to dry before doing first coat? Also if rain is a certainty after 48 hours drying time from prep, would it help if I laid down plastic over deck to keep it dry during rain, and then assuming no water got on deck with plastic and stain? LASTLY, MINIMUM time stain needs to dry after applying 1st coat and or two coats? THANK YOU.

Dan
Dan
11 days ago

After applying the TWP 1500 series to Hemlock garage doors, do you recommend a sealer? Or is a sealer not necessary with TWP 1500 series?

Dan
Dan
10 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks. I do want to confirm though, a “maintenance” coat is recommended after 9 months or so on new wood. And that can be applied over the existing TWP application.

David Carl
David Carl
7 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Question about your response-You say use cleaner and brightner for prep to do a second coat in 9-24 months. Won’t the cleaner and brightener REMOVE, or greatly weaken the first coat that was applied 9-24 months previously?

David Carl
David Carl
6 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks. Really appreciate the help as a big newbie.

Previous TWP advice has recommended I sand off mill glaze/fuzzies already on my never been stained pressure treated pine deck I already have AFTER applying the gemini cleaner and BEFORE applying the gemini brightner.

1) Curious though why not apply cleaner and brightner and then sand?

2) In applying the first coat to my 400 SF deck (that will be sanded with 60 OR 80 grit sandpaper to remove the mill glaze already present on some planks before the cleaner/brigtner applied) do I do 2-4 boards at a time….apply first coat…then if wood has soaked in first coat within 30-60 minutes go back and apply second coat to the 2-4 planks before moving on?

3) Would you advise to just do first coat and wait a year to apply second coat because I did do some sanding on my deck to remove the mill glaze?

David Carl
David Carl
6 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks. So to confirm:

1) wet deck with power washer
2) apply cleaner
3) rinse with power washer (40 degree arc tip on wand, hold 12 inches away so as to not destroy deck wood?)
4) Let deck dry to the touch
5 Sand with either 60 OR 80 grit paper
6) apply brightner and rinse with power washer
7) Let deck dry 48 hours after applying brightner.
8) Apply two coats
9 Ensure you have no rain for 48 hours after applying either first or second coat?

***If I see it may rain after deck has only been drying for 24 hours do I cover deck in plastic?

David Carl
David Carl
5 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

OK. So what to do if deck dries for only 24 hours and then it rains?

 
Sean L
Sean L
14 days ago

I just finished sanding my railings/posts on my 4 year old deck with 60 grit and looking to get them cleaned, brightened and stained before moving into the floor boards since it is such a large deck. The wood looks near new after sanding. Can I go ahead and clean/brighten/stain when I’m ready or should I let it sit over the winter first?

Last edited 14 days ago by Sean L
Bill Allen
Bill Allen
16 days ago

Does this apply to kiln-dried lumber as well? I am replacing steps and handrails (some covered, some not) and all the cedar has been kiln dried.

James Geister
James Geister
24 days ago

We had our deck enlarged, a roof put over 1/2 of it and the rails and all deck boards all replaced in the first week of June this year. The roof over half of the deck solved the gypsy moth caterpillar feces issue this spring and early summer for that half, but the rest of the deck was badly stained by caterpillar feces. Our plan was to try to use Restore-a Deck in early fall to clean the entire deck and get rid of the fecal stains from the uncovered half so that we can stain it before it gets covered with caterpillar feces next spring. However, the deck boards beneath the covered half of our deck still bead up water that’s placed on them very nicely, but the uncovered poop-stained boards don’t bead up water at this time indicating that there’s a difference between them in their readiness for stain. We live in Northern Michigan and if we wait until the weather is good enough to stain next year the new fecal stains will double or triple the stains we have now before we can clean and stain. , making cleaning the deck boards even more difficult. If we clean and stain the boards beneath the roof now, they may not absorb the stain very well leading to a color discrepancy. I have enclosed a photo taken about 3 minutes after pouring some water on a deck board beneath the covered part of out deck. Any advice on the best way to remedy our dilemma would be greatly appreciated.

IMG_4525.jpeg
James Geister
James Geister
24 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks for your reply! It’s usually difficult to string together enough dry days in early spring before the the caterpillars become active to be able to get it done. If not we’ll do it July/August after the caterpillars are finished staining the uncovered part of our deck. Will our unopened 5 gallon can of TWP stain still be ok for use next year? It is stored in our always cool basement.

James Geister
James Geister
23 days ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thank You!

 
Colton
Colton
28 days ago

I have a cedar decking that was originally rough cut, then planed smooth. I installed 3 years ago. The following fall I put twp 1500 on it. It did not absorb well as anticipated, but has been 24 months since first stain. I have power washed dirt off, but now what do you recommend for this 2nd time around staining? Prep and stain? Thanks

Ron
Ron
30 days ago

I used the last step of prep #2 rinsed and waiting the 48 hrs. We’ve had very light rain the last two nights just enough to get the surface wet. Do I need to restart the 48 hour clock after the little bit of rainfall.

TJ C
TJ C
1 month ago

I am sanding the outdoor sections of my deck to 80 grit and have 1600 square feet of deck including verticals railings and steps. Part of the deck is covered and screened in and does not need sanding. How many gallons of stain do I need and do I apply wet on wet?

 
William
William
1 month ago

I am installing 3 cedar posts on my front porch. The posts came from trees felled on the property and were sawn and kiln-tried at a local mill for a month.I would consider them to be rough sawn, but I can see some saw blade marks that I can sand away with a light touch and 80 grit sandpaper. Since these were kiln dried and have been minimally processed, do I still need to let them weather and then restore them? Also, the posts are not clear…there are several knot holes and a few are deep. Do you have a suggesting for filling these before sealing…or how to handle these areas?

Last edited 1 month ago by William
Shelly
Shelly
1 month ago

Here is a picture of a section where there is new and old siding

0AA0F5C3-6928-4238-8D9D-0B09234BAEF8.jpeg
Shelly
Shelly
1 month ago

Hello,
We had a garage fire last winter. We have new rough (not smooth)cedar siding around the garage area that has been replaced and the rest of the existing cedar siding on the house appears to have a semi solid stain applied from previous owner. We’ve lived here 15 years and have not done anything to the existing cedar siding. Two sides of the house will be stained, to include both new and existing cedar siding. From reading others questions, you recommend sanding to remove older stain but we can’t as the siding is a rough cedar. The restoration contractor pressure washed the existing older siding and wants to apply stain over this as it now sits. Will we have issues with stain penetration? What would you recommend we do?

Shelly
Shelly
1 month ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thank you, very much, for your quick response.

 
Nicholas
Nicholas
1 month ago

Can you apply 1500 series over 100 series? I’m considering staining a new cedar fence with TWP 103, dark oak. If we wind up wanting something darker, next year can I use 1504, dark walnut? Thanks.

Dave
Dave
1 month ago

I just finished building a new deck with kiln dried southern pine in Central Virginia- since most of the moisture is out of the wood, can I apply TWS 100 promptly? Can I use an airless ( grago 550) to apply?

Dave
Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks! Much appreciate the prompt response!

Ian
Ian
1 month ago

How long should you wait before applying TWP to freshly rough cut pine poles and beams?

 
Catherine
Catherine
1 month ago

I just received the 2 sample stains (Pecan & Rustic) to help choose a color while our deck is under construction. Is it advisable to clean and brighten the sample piece of wood before applying the stains? If my concern is only to compare the two stain colors and not wood preservation, can I expect the sample stains on un-prepped wood to be representative of the stain on the finished deck’s prepped wood in a couple of months?

Catherine
Catherine
1 month ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks!

Dave Carl
Dave Carl
1 month ago

HI, It’s been two years since my deck was installed. Treated Pine. I waited a year, and was poised to apply Cabot. I applied the deck cleaner. Became ill and never applied immediately the wood brighter from cabot. Did not use power washer, so I suspect the caustic cleaner left on and two winters took their tool. Picture shows my deck now; as you see, some planks have the UV damage. Question. After applying the wood cleaner, many of the planks suffered “furring” which I understand is from “over oxidation.” Confirming, should 1) I sand off these fuzzies anywhere I seem them AFTER I apply the TWP deck cleaner and wood brighter? If yes, what weight sandpaper to use (fine? medium? 2) Should I use a power washer — set on the lowest setting (least powerful) to wash off the TWWP cleaner and brightener? I ask that last question in light of the fact that my garden hose spigot set on strongest setting did not really seem to wash off the cabot deck cleaner. Thanks.

DECK 2.JPG
After Shot deck.jpg
Dave Keith
Dave Keith
1 month ago
Reply to  TWP Help

Thanks. Question shouldn’t I wait until AFTER I use Gemini Brightener, since I assume the brightener will also cause furring?

Pauline
Pauline
1 month ago

My fence is installed one month ago. 1 week after, the neighbor whom I share the fence with
” sealed” his side of the fence with an oil -base clear coat and water his plants next to the fence profusely. Few days later, I notice dark water marks ( rennin?)on the bottom of my fence which did not go away after the wood is dry, mild sanding and wood brightener.
How do I remove this stain effectively before staining my side of the fence? Should I wait a few months before staining knowing the neighbor will continue watering onto the fence and probably cause more dark stains or should I stain now?
Another question: I tried new stain color on my redwood fence, now I cannot remove it with commercial stain removal liquid. Can I fully remove fresh stain on newly installed redwood fence? If yes, how?